Advice for dealing with anxiety and depression in kids morbus ledderhose disease the nook

We are so grateful to have Sarah Kang, a child psychologist, writing this month–the 70th year of Mental Health Awareness Month–to talk about the important and often, less-well-understood mental health issues in younger kids. In addition, we received some great advice and tips from some women morbus ledderhose disease in The Nook community who are not mental health professionals morbus ledderhose disease but work with kids on a daily basis and have morbus ledderhose disease a great deal of value to add to this important morbus ledderhose disease conversation. The purpose of this article is not to diagnose a morbus ledderhose disease child with a mental disorder or to recommend a specific morbus ledderhose disease treatment plan. Unlike a simple broken bone, the right course of treatment and care for mental health morbus ledderhose disease can vary from individual to individual. It is important for parents to seek expert advice from morbus ledderhose disease a pediatric mental health professional if they are seriously worried morbus ledderhose disease about their children. The purpose of this article is to discuss some examples morbus ledderhose disease and make sure that this topic is not taboo and morbus ledderhose disease can be discussed freely within the Nook community and beyond.

Anxiety is an adaptive and natural response to stressful or morbus ledderhose disease dangerous situations. In fact, stranger anxiety in infancy is part of healthy emotional development. Throughout child development, there are developmentally appropriate fears or worries that arise, such as stranger anxiety in infants or separation anxiety in morbus ledderhose disease toddlers. When these fears or worries become excessive–severely impacting several aspects of the child’s daily functioning and persisting beyond what is expected given morbus ledderhose disease the child’s age or development–this may be indicative of an anxiety disorder.

Symptoms of an anxiety disorder include a pervasive, excessive fear or worry that is difficult to control, as well as restlessness, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, irritability, muscle tension, or sleep difficulties that significantly impair a child’s functioning and persist for at least 6 months. Anxiety may also manifest in physical symptoms (e.g., stomachaches, headaches, nail biting), irritability, and angry outbursts. Because symptoms of anxiety can be highly variable, it may be difficult to accurately diagnose anxiety, particularly in early childhood.

For school-aged children, it will also be important to label, acknowledge, and empathize with their feelings, worries, and fears. It can also be helpful to “play detective” to figure out what anxiety looks and feels like for morbus ledderhose disease your child, as this will allow the child (and you) to identify when these feelings arise and develop coping strategies.

When we know our own personality, and also that of the child, we can better navigate tough conversations. For example, both my son and I are choleric and full of morbus ledderhose disease fire, so behaviorally, I want to respond with fire – but that’s like throwing fuel on the flames! Instead, what my son needs is to be held and given morbus ledderhose disease one-on-one time with me. This calms his fire (and mine), and helps him open up to me when he’s ready.

Since unexpected changes can increase feelings of anxiety, another strategy parents can use is maintaining a consistent routine morbus ledderhose disease and preparing children by providing adequate time to get ready morbus ledderhose disease and as much information as developmentally appropriate. In addition, here are some other strategies that parents have found effective morbus ledderhose disease in coping with anxiety:

I’m such a believer in mindfulness. The action of naming emotions and practicing being present in morbus ledderhose disease the moment activates the prefrontal cortex, which helps regulate emotions, and take control away from the amygdala, which causes the fight, flight, or freeze response. The most powerful tool is breathing, but there’s so many great mindfulness practices my students love – gratitude, heartfulness, mindful movement, mindful listening, mindful eating. I can’t stress enough how much kids need this. Today’s kids are online all the time and live in morbus ledderhose disease front of a screen, and social media causes so much anxiety. They really need to learn how to be present in morbus ledderhose disease the moment and connect with their feelings.

Children with depression often become irritable and engage in angry morbus ledderhose disease outbursts. Furthermore, children may present with physical symptoms (e.g., headaches or stomachaches, restlessness), anxiety, behavioral issues, and irritability. The symptoms of depression may include: depressed mood, loss of interest or withdrawal, significant changes in weight or appetite, sleep disturbances, fatigue, feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness, difficulty concentrating, or thoughts of suicide.

With young children, depression may be difficult to diagnose because they lack the morbus ledderhose disease verbal skills to accurately convey these feelings. Both younger and older children tend to display more prominent morbus ledderhose disease physical symptoms, irritability, or angry outbursts. Younger children may also present with regression from developmental milestones morbus ledderhose disease or failure to thrive without a medical origin.

I recommend consulting with a parenting coach (especially one familiar with intuitive parenting, such as in Waldorf education or Simplicity Parenting), a qualified nutritionist who is familiar with kids, science and eating behaviors (I’m not kidding! Food is fuel, remember, and is the foundation of wellness or illness). Also, consider whether the school/learning environment is suitable for your child’s personality – perhaps explore other schools in your area to find out morbus ledderhose disease if the values, techniques and systems are a better match.

Even older children, who have the emotional capacity and expressive ability to more morbus ledderhose disease clearly express their feelings, may still struggle to fully identify and express their experiences morbus ledderhose disease and feelings. Symptoms of depression can vary widely among children. Parents can help their children more accurately identify their emotions, acknowledge and empathize with these hard feelings, and begin to bridge the gap between thoughts, behaviors, and mood.

Similar to working with children with anxiety, parents can work with their children on developing strong emotional morbus ledderhose disease vocabularies. Again, it can be helpful to utilize children’s books about sadness or depression, as this allows for a more concrete representation of an morbus ledderhose disease abstract concept like depression. Discussing the book character’s thoughts or feelings may be an easier, less vulnerable way to begin talking about the feelings that morbus ledderhose disease your child may be experiencing.

Another important thing is for parents to model their own morbus ledderhose disease mental health practices. For example, when parents are feeling down or anxious, they can model talking about their feelings and discuss the morbus ledderhose disease things they do to cope in a healthy way (like maybe leave out the part about downing a bottle morbus ledderhose disease of Cab, but talk about going for a walk to de-stress).

Children may begin to more freely express thoughts and feelings morbus ledderhose disease when engaged in art activities, such as creating “sad monsters” based on the book characters. Since children often lack the ability to regulate their emotions morbus ledderhose disease effectively, children will benefit from developing strong coping skills through deep morbus ledderhose disease breathing, engaging in calming activities, mindfulness or meditation techniques, and sensory-based coping skills.

I think a combination of support is always helpful. Try and find a licensed MH counselor that is a morbus ledderhose disease good fit. Involve your spouse or SO in the discussion. Discuss with them safe friends or peers they can turn morbus ledderhose disease to and reach out to the school counselor or social morbus ledderhose disease worker. Communicate with them your intentions and make sure they are morbus ledderhose disease on board with your plan. Some children benefit from a change in their diet, supplements, medications, acupuncture, essential oils, exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy.

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