Other health issues ledderhose disease radiotherapy of special concern for people living with hiv hiv.gov

Among these conditions are mental health issues, alcohol use, and drug use. The risk of HIV infection is higher among people whose ledderhose disease radiotherapy lives are affected by mental health issues like depression, anxiety, or the psychological effects of bullying, sexual abuse, or physical abuse. Alcohol and drug use also increase a person’s risk of exposure to HIV and other sexually transmitted ledderhose disease radiotherapy diseases.

Regardless of whether they played a role in someone’s risk for getting HIV, mental health and substance use disorders can make it harder ledderhose disease radiotherapy for people living with HIV to take ART daily as ledderhose disease radiotherapy prescribed. But behavioral health treatment and services are available. Talk openly and honestly with your health care provider about ledderhose disease radiotherapy your mental health and substance use so that he or ledderhose disease radiotherapy she can evaluate you and help you find the support ledderhose disease radiotherapy you need.

• Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C—Hepatitis B and C are contagious liver diseases. Like HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be transmitted sexually or by injection drug use. So about one-third of people living with HIV in the United States ledderhose disease radiotherapy are coinfected with either HBV or HCV. If left untreated, they can lead to liver disease, liver cancer, and liver failure. Hepatitis B can be prevented with a vaccine. There is no cure for hepatitis B, but treatment can delay or limit liver damage. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C, but treatment cures up to 90 percent of people who ledderhose disease radiotherapy take it in 12-24 weeks. Everyone living with HIV should be tested for hepatitis B ledderhose disease radiotherapy and C. Learn more about hepatitis B and C and people living ledderhose disease radiotherapy with HIV.

• Tuberculosis—Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs spread through the air ledderhose disease radiotherapy from a person with untreated TB disease. TB usually affects the lungs, but it can affect other parts of the body. It can cause serious health problems if left untreated. Worldwide, TB is one of the leading causes of death among ledderhose disease radiotherapy people living with HIV. That’s why it is important for people living with HIV ledderhose disease radiotherapy to be tested for TB and for those who test ledderhose disease radiotherapy positive to begin treatment. Learn about HIV and TB coinfection.

• Opportunistic infections—Opportunistic infections (OIs) are infections that occur more frequently or are more severe ledderhose disease radiotherapy in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with HIV. People are at greatest risk for OIs when their CD4 ledderhose disease radiotherapy count falls below 200. When a person with HIV gets certain OIs or specific ledderhose disease radiotherapy cancers, they will get diagnosed with AIDS (also known as HIV Stage 3), the most serious stage of HIV infection. Taking HIV medication daily as prescribed, staying in regular medical care, and getting your lab tests done are key to staying ledderhose disease radiotherapy healthy and preventing these infections. Learn more about how opportunistic infections affect people living with ledderhose disease radiotherapy HIV.

Thanks to improvements in HIV treatment, people living with HIV are living longer than ever. But even when HIV is well controlled with medication, it causes chronic inflammation. Over time, that takes a toll on the body, putting people living with HIV at greater risk for health ledderhose disease radiotherapy conditions such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, diabetes, bone disease, liver disease, cognitive disorders, and some types of cancer. Your health care provider will work with you, or may refer you to a specialist, to treat any of these conditions you may develop.

Some people also experience side effects from HIV medicines that ledderhose disease radiotherapy can continue for a long time. See your health care provider regularly and discuss any side ledderhose disease radiotherapy effects you experience. Never cut down, skip, or stop taking your HIV medications unless your health care ledderhose disease radiotherapy provider tells you to. Your provider will work with you to develop a plan ledderhose disease radiotherapy to manage the side effects, or may recommend that you change medication.

RELATED POSTS